Heavy Metal Hall of Fame

yachting/images/magazine/2007/052007/fea_driven1_400x489.jpg

1 This 1953 Hydrojet from the Kermath Manufacturing Co. inhaled water from behind the nozzle. Kermath claimed a discharge rate of 1,100 gallons per minute. As is common today, the helm steered the nozzle through 360 degrees.

yachting/images/magazine/2007/052007/fea_driven2_175x235.jpg

2 The saildrive (this one by Yanmar), featuring minimal drag and good thrust, revolutionized auxiliary power for high-performance sailboats.

yachting/images/magazine/2007/052007/fea_driven3_550x231.jpg

3 Rolls-Royce Merlin and Allison V-12 aircraft engines of more than 1,000 hp sent speed into the stratosphere.

yachting/images/magazine/2007/052007/fea_driven4_550x288.jpg

4 Gas turbine engines similar to this General Electric T58 made their marine debut with Donald Campbell's record-setting Bluebird. Nowadays, gas turbines power the Unlimited Hydroplanes and a variety of high-speed superyachts.

yachting/images/magazine/2007/052007/fea_driven5_550x219.jpg

5 The most significant advances in the propulsion of sailboats have come from the sailcloth, and the 3DL from North Sails. Introduced in 1992, this technology thermo-molds sails as a unitary membrane on a full-size 3-dimensional mold. A 3DL sail stretches less for its weight, holds its shape over a wider range of wind speeds and retains its designed shape longer.