11 Excellent Express Cruisers

These cruisers are sure to get you from start to finish in style and comfort.

Pershing 70
On a bright, sunny fall day off Cannes, France, I pushed the Pershing 70’s throttles to their stops. I felt a surge of performance as the twin 1,600-horsepower MTU 10V 2000 M94 diesels climbed up above 2,400 rpm. A light wind had roiled the coastal waters into a compact chop, which the 17-degree monohedral (constant deadrise) deep-V hull beneath my feet parted with ease. I glanced at the console and saw 46 knots staring back, and I have to admit it made me smile. To read the rest of the feature, click here.
Cheoy Lee Alpha 87 ES
Those of us of a certain age will remember back in the late 1960s when 7UP labeled itself "the uncola" to separate from the soft-drink pack. We might steal the phrase and label the Alpha 87 ES (Express Sportbridge) the “un-Cheoy.” To read the rest of the feature, click here.
Sea Ray L590
After traveling up the East Coast of the United States, stopping in several major ports of call, the L590 touched down in New York for two final events. On June 25, the yacht visited Chelsea Piers, with a follow up two days later, concluding the tour with a party in Sag Harbor. To read the rest of the feature, click here.
Otam 58
The Otam 58 feels big. She’s brutal in a powerful sort of way, and beautiful. She stands out among the galaxy of sport cruisers on the market today, and in my book she ticks just about all the boxes. To read the full feature, click here.
Riviera 6000 SY
A day in the life of a Riviera 6000 SY You’ve found a quiet cove, protected from wind and any hint of boat traffic. You drop anchor. It’s just your family and a couple of the kids’ friends. Time to max out this yacht’s potential. To read the rest of the feature, click here.
Hunton XRS37
I stood gobsmacked. The swordlike profile, metallic silver topsides and teak-accented side decks and foredeck of the U.K.-built Hunton XRS37 offered Bond-like sophistication. Gazing at her lines as she approached the transient dock at the Fort Lauderdale International Boat Show was like looking at a perfectly tailored tuxedo. I soon discovered that underneath that fine form is a vessel that has a license to thrill, too. The finely pointed bow of my 37 scowled at the sea, ­daring the water to come at her. To read the rest of the feature, click here.
Cruiser Yachts 390 Express Coupe
The Cruisers Yachts 390 Express Coupe melds the entertainment value of an express cruiser with the cover and cruising ability of a coupe, creating a fully satisfying yachting experience. First, the amidships master stateroom with en suite head offers the capaciousness of the 390 EC’s 12-foot-9-inch beam bedecked in the luxury of designer fixtures, fittings and fabrics. At press time, she remains the only “40-footer” offering such digs. To read the rest of the feature, click here.
Numarine 70
WHEN NUMARINE CEO Omer Malaz introduced the company’s 70, he also announced that the builder was targeting international clients: “With this 70, we are aiming at a competitive sector of the -market, so we need to make our yachts stand out from the competition.” In terms of styling, there is no doubt the Turkish--built 70 does that. She is sleek and high-tech with a look that’s hard to forget. To read the full feature, click here.
Delta 54 IPS
If your first conscious memory is rolling around the salon of a big Hatteras convertible in foul weather, then you’re likely born to be around boats. At least that’s the case for Chapman Ducote, sales director of the Americas for Swedish builder Delta Powerboats . Ducote is a hard-core boat owner, free diver and spearfisherman who’s had everything from a 13-foot Boston Whaler and go-fast craft to large motoryachts and sport-fishermen. To read the full feature, click here.
Jeanneau's Leader 40
Weather plays a crucial role in boat testing: Sometimes you get calm seas and have to imagine how the boat would behave in rough water, and other times it’s so tempestuous that everyone’s reluctant to head out. When I tested Jeanneau ’s Leader 40, conditions were snotty and the sea trial was delayed several hours thanks to 40-knot winds. When the wind dropped to 30 knots, we went out into short, steep seas that proved the benefits of this yacht’s deeper-­than-average V-shaped hull. To read the full feature, click here.
Fairline Targa 48 Open
The designator open on most performance yachts refers to an unobstructed cockpit exposed to the elements. For U.K. builder Fairline, however, the open in its Targa series carries a more flexible meaning: one that lets the owner choose between a full-sky experience or buttoned-down protection. Its Targa 48 Open has a hardtop that encloses the cockpit but is open at the after end. To read the rest of the feature, click here.