Charter the Caribbean

Charter yachts have been preparing new contracts, safety procedures and more to welcome guests aboard.

St. Lucia
The Pitons on St. Lucia are among the Caribbean’s most distinctive natural landmarks.Scott Taylor

Covid-19 has caused some of the biggest changes to the crewed yacht-charter industry in decades. Like everything travel-related, the charter business has adapted to the pandemic’s realities. That means new types of contracts, new safety procedures for guests and crew, and more.

By mid-July, after a few months of the pandemic’s initial problems, major charter companies worldwide were reporting bookings starting to resume. The summer season was, by all accounts, slow, but it offered a chance to test out new policies and ideas ahead of the winter season in the Caribbean.

Many charter yachts can now be booked with contracts that outline contingencies and refunds should a COVID-19-related illness or government shutdown occur. There are new sanitation protocols aboard many yachts, as well as plans for handling an illness that may emerge on board.

If you’re ready to get away for a break (and who among us isn’t?), then the opportunity awaits. The Caribbean is calling.

The Yachts

Quite a few charter yachts are accepting inquiries for this winter in the Caribbean.

  • Okto is a 216-foot ISA that’s part of the Camper & Nicholsons International fleet. She can hit 18 knots.
  • Relentless is a 145-foot Trinity in the RJC Yachts fleet. She just had a refit in 2019.
  • Lady J is a 142-foot Palmer Johnson in the Churchill Yacht Partners fleet. She offers scuba and fishing.
  • Pure Bliss is a 143-foot Burger in the Ocean Independence fleet. She takes 12 guests.
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