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Photo Equipment Upgrades

Upgrade your photo equipment to capture your next cruise in rich detail.

January 28, 2011
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Photo Equipment Upgrades

Pentax A-5
The Pentax A-5 ($1,600 for the body, $1,750 with lens shown) is constructed with a magnesium-alloy shell over a stainless steel chassis that resists water, fog, snow, sand, dust and anything else you may encounter. The A-5’s operating temperature range of 14 to 104 degrees F makes it suitable for shooting great images in the chill of the Inside Passage or the warmth of the Caribbean. Pentax, 800-877-0155; www.pentaximaging.com

gobandit GPS HD
Ever looked at a photo or video and said “Where were we in this one?” The GPS HD ($350) from gobandit eliminates the guesswork by recording the location, speed and route as well as 720p video and synching it up. Built rugged and waterproof to stand up to the ridiculous conditions experienced by adrenaline junkies, the GPS HD nails the soundtrack on the flying bridge with a noise-controlled microphone to quiet the wind. It can also capture high-definition stills at two- or five-second intervals and software makes sharing easy with Facebook, YouTube and others. And at just over four inches long, less than 2½ inches high and 11/3 inches wide, it may be the perfect companion for boat-show walk-throughs.

Canon PowerShot G12
The Canon PowerShot G12 ($500) features Canon’s new high-dynamic range, a setting that allows multiple shots to be combined into one image. Capture the full spectrum of a harbor sunset, from the dark tones of the water to the bright white of the boats, to the glow of the waning sun. Add this setting to the G12’s hybrid IS technology, which uses an angular sensor and an accelerator to compensate for the pitch of the vessel or a shaky hand, and the result is images from the G12 that are crisp and vivid. Canon, 800- 652-2666; www.usa.canon.com

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Sony a55 DSLR
The Sony a55 DSLR ($750 for the body, $850 with lens shown) can record 1080/60i HD video and utilizes Sony’s translucent-mirror technology, which directs light to both the image sensor and the phase-detection auto-focus sensor simultaneously, giving users an advantage when shooting speeding boats or starting-line action. The a55 has 19.5 times the area of the typical camcorder image sensor, records at the same resolution and frame rate as most broadcast and cable HDTV shows, and produces professional looking, high-resolution and high-definition video. Sony, 877-865-7669; www.sony.com

Nikon D7000
The Nikon D7000 ($1,200 for the body, $1,500 with lens shown) uses a 16.2-megapixel CMOS image sensor and Nikon’s new Expeed 2 image-processing system combined with 14-bit analog/ digital conversion to provide a high level of even tonal gradations and manage contrast, color, exposure and noise — resulting in high-quality, low-light images. Great for early morning shots of the mooring field or the end of sunset over the bay, the D7000 has an ISO range of 100 to 6,400 (which can be expanded to a Hi-2 setting for an ISO range reaching 25,600) for shooters working with variable or unfavorable light. Nikon, 631-547-4200; www.nikonusa.com

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Lowepro DryZone Rover
The DryZone Rover from Lowepro ($310) is a waterproof camera housing, a hydration pack and a dry bag all rolled into one. Put your camera, cell phone and anything else that can’t get wet into the lower compartment for greater moisture protection during a ride in the tender or a hike along the rocks in search of that perfect shot. The upper compartment is a good place to stash a windbreaker, harbor guidebook or snack. Lowepro, 707-827- 4000; www.lowepro.com

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