New Boats

No matter how you like to enjoy your time on the water, the Miami International Boat Show has just the yacht for you.

Whether you're planning to head out for extended passages, release a big blue or repose in undivided luxury, the Miami International Boat Show has your ticket to fun in the sun. Here, Yachting offers a look at the great new yachts you shouldn't miss.

CABO YACHTS continues to produce fishing machines with flair. The newest is the Michael Peters-designed 40 Flybridge. The long list of amenities for fishermen includes a galley with a recessed stove (no more sliding pots), comfortable accommodations for long runs and well-thought-out mechanical systems. The layout includes two cabins: a forward master, and a portside guest cabin with two single berths. The fuel tank is fiberglass, and oil-change and washdown systems are equipped with quick fittings. Cabo Yachts Inc., (760) 246-8917; www.caboyachts.com.

Just glance at the photo of the Kaitos 76 from CANTIERI DI PISA, and you'll likely agree with the builder's description: "open sport motor cruiser." When you push 72,000 pounds at over 50 knots, you are sportin' for sure. The MTU power, delivered to Arneson surface drives, pushes the Kaitos 76 to a 54-knot top end, according to the company. At 40 knots, her range should be about 400 miles. The Kaitos 76 accommodates six guests and two crewmembers. Hideaway Marina, (954) 943-3200; www.cantieridipisa.it.

Among the many things to crow about on CARVER's 65 Marquis is the optional his-and-her master head. This one takes into consideration a woman's needs-hers has the shower and tub, a vanity counter with a stool and twice the volume, which should keep the boss happy. When you walk down the dock, however, don't look for the familiar Carver profile; if you do, you'll go right past her. Carver Yachts, (920) 822-1600; www.carveryachts.com.

The news from CRUISERS is not so much the 500 Express as the builder's flexibility with regard to the 500 Express. For the VIP stateroom, positioned forward, owners may choose to include twin berths or a large single berth. The interior, which has 6 feet, 6 inches of headroom, includes a sprawling, crescent-shape settee, the latest in entertainment systems and plenty of classic cherry. Cruisers Yachts, (920) 834-2211; www.cruisersyachts.com.

Whether she's equipped with a pair of 715 hp Volvos or 1,015 hp MANs, FAIRLINE's Targa 62 will hit at least 30 knots, according to the company. Engines on the beefier end should push her to 36 knots. The Targa 62 has a unique top configuration that includes a power-opening roof. The cockpit area, where guests likely will converge, is prepared to handle the task. This finely finished yacht includes a fully outfitted galley, a U-shape dinette and seating for a half-dozen or more. Fairline, (954) 525-7430; www.fairline.com.

HAMPTON YACHTS' new 680 Pilothouse has a modified-V fiberglass hull, which is 18 feet wide and solid below the waterline. Her three cabins have en suite heads. The large flying-bridge deck, which shields the cockpit from the elements, is outfitted in the manner of a beachside resort, with a bar and barbecue space. The area also provides stowage space for a tender. Hampton Yachts offers customization to suit individual preferences. Hampton Yachts, (949) 673-6300; www.hamptonyacht.com.

There are a few names that stand out in sportfisherman design, and Charles J. Jannace is one of them. JANNACE's new 43-footer seems well proportioned, with a level foredeck and 110 square feet of cockpit. The builder estimates the 430C will hit a 32-knot cruise with a pair of 700 hp Caterpillar C12s, which are standard. She sports a solid bottom, cored sides and a draft of less than 4 feet. Her base price, south of $700,000, includes a matching set of rods and reels. Sportfishing Yachts Unlimited, (954) 609-8404, www.jannaceyachts.com.

The 78E from MARLOW MARINE is the new flagship of the builder's Explorer Raised Pilothouse series. Marlow expects her to hit a 25-knot cruise with a pair of Caterpillar C30s. An optional 240 hp Yanmar cruising pod will boost the range of this sleek yacht to 4,000 miles. The 78E offers everything you would expect to see on a vessel of this stature, including a choice of three or four staterooms. Marlow Marine, (800) 362-2657; www.marlowmarine.com.

The 350 Cruiser is the first model of the "new generation" at MONTEREY BOATS. This express cruiser has a private mid-cabin with two single berths that convert to a queen. Owners can create additional sleeping space forward by converting the U-shape dinette into a double berth. With a pair of Volvo 8.1 GXI gas engines, the 350 should cruise nicely at 30 knots and burn 34 gallons per hour, according to the manufacturer. The transom and swim platform incorporate amenities usually found on larger yachts. Monterey Boats, (352) 528-2628; www.montereyboats.com.

In this corner, weighing in at 53,540 pounds, is the NORDHAVN 43. That's the kind of displacement you want in a 43-footer destined to seek out exotic gunkholes in not-yet-named atolls. In typical Nordhavn fashion, her single Lugger exhausts through a dry stack and out the masthead. A look at her profile and spec sheet will comfort all fans-this new trawler is built to the exact standards her siblings were. Some particulars include a 14-foot, 10-inch beam, a draft just shy of 5 feet and a 1,200-gallon fuel capacity. Pacific Asian Enterprises, (949) 496-4848; www.nordhavn.com.

The Altus 42 was such a success that OCEAN ALEXANDER could not help but build her a big sister. The Altus 48 is a true sedan, with a slightly raised trunk, stout house and spacious flying bridge. The master stateroom, which has a double island berth, is forward. The Altus 48 also has two guest cabins: one with double berths and another with upper-and-lower berths. Yanmar provides the power of choice-twin 440 hp engines are standard; 500s are optional. Ocean Alexander, (206) 344-8566; www.oceanalexander.com.

The news from SEA RAY is the launch of the 550 Sedan Bridge and 390 Sundancer. The 550 Sedan Bridge is a handsome project, boasting a clean hull with an even sheerline, a large flying-bridge area and a stylish hardtop. Her beam is 16 feet, and her bottom has a deadrise of 17 degrees. The accommodations plan shows a full-beam master with athwartships berth and private head, and two guest cabins that share the boat's other head. The Sundancer name is perhaps one of the most well known in the industry; the 390 should live up to that fine reputation. Sea Ray, (800) SR-BOATS, www.searay.com.

If her pedigree is any indication, the Real Ships 68 from SHIPS INTERNATIONAL will not only have the look of an expedition yacht, she will perform like one. The 68 is built on a hard-chine modified-V hull. A center keel and twin propeller skegs protect the running gear. Since the pilothouse is sure to be heavily populated while the boat is under way, the area is functional and fit for a crowd. Cruising speed is dialed in around 8.5 knots. Ships International, (954) 764-3702; www.realships.com.

VIKING SPORT CRUISERS' 57 Flybridge is a three-stateroom, two-head craft. The flying-bridge deck has three social areas, according to the builder: a sunpad for the sunbathers, a dinette and U-shape settee for those who want a relaxed perch and, for those with an interest in where they are headed, companion and adjacent lounge seating at the helm. The area also includes amenities such as a chill box, grill, wet bar and sink. The captain, of course, will have a stellar view from above. Viking Yachts, (609) 296-6000; www.vikingyachts.com.

For more information on any of these boats, contact: (866) 922-4877; www.yachtingnet.com/yachting/productinfo.