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July’s 6 New Electronics

A look at our picks for new electronics you should know about in July.

July 14, 2017
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Garmin’s Solid-State Compass

Garmin’s Solid-State Compass
Garmin’s Solid-State Compass Courtesy Garmin

First it was magnetic compasses, then fluxgate compasses — the next evolution? Solid state. Garmin‘s solid-state compass ($649) has a black-box nine-axis heading sensor and uses an Altitude Heading Reference System, adapted from the aviation and consumer-electronics industries, to yield fast, accurate information. Garmin’s heading sensor is accurate to 2 degrees and reports data at a rate of 10 Hz to an NMEA 2000 network, where it can be used by various instruments and systems, from the autopilot to the chart plotter.

Fell Marine Wireless MOB+ System

Fell Marine’s Wireless MOB+ System
Fell Marine’s Wireless MOB+ System Courtesy Fell Marine

For solo yachtsmen or skeleton crews, Fell Marine’s Wireless MOB+ system (from $179) provides peace of mind. Users carry or wear the MOB+ xFOB, which maintains constant electronic contact with the xHUB base station. Should an xFOB-equipped crew member travel more than 50 feet away from the base station or become submerged, that contact is broken. The xHUB electronically kills the boat’s engine(s) within one second and triggers auditory and visual alarms on an xHUB base station.

Simrad NSS Evo3

Simrad’s NSS Evo3
Simrad’s NSS Evo3 Courtesy Simrad

Simrad’s NSS Evo3 ($1,299 to $5,499) has SolarMax HD screens, which are designed to work in direct sunlight and offer wide viewing angles. These multifunction devices come in four screen sizes: 7, 9, 12 and 16 inches. Each has a built-in, dual-channel chirp sounder, a 10 Hz internal GPS an-tenna and Wi-Fi connectivity. NSS Evo3 MFDs include touchscreen interfaces and keyboards with rotary dials. Simrad’s TripIntel software can be used for trip planning based on variables such as fuel range and tides.

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FLIR AX8

FLIR AX8
FLIR’s AX8 Courtesy FLIR

FLIR’s AX8 dual-payload camera increases engine-room awareness and prevents fires. The AX8 ($1,199) is mounted in an engine room and can detect abnormal operating temperatures, which trip onboard alarms. The camera is 2.1 inches long and 1 inch wide with a height of either 3.7 inches with connectors or 3.1 inches without them. Thus, the camera can fit in tight compartments and cabinets. The AX8 provides three viewing options: standard visual, thermal imaging and the hybrid “MSX multispectral dynamic imaging.”

Fusion Entertainment 200-watt Sound-Panel

Fusion Entertainment 200-watt Sound-Panel
Fusion Entertainment’s 200-watt Sound-Panel Courtesy Fusion

Fusion Entertainment’s 200-watt Sound-Panel ($199) has dual 4-inch speakers, soft-dome tweeters, and a tuned and sealed passive bass radiator designed to deliver a rich, full sound in a shallow-mount stereo. Four mounting options range from flush-mount to surface-mount, all with stainless-steel hardware. Sound-Panels are available with white or black front-face grilles, and all models have fronts and backs that are rated IP65 weather-resistant for interior or on-deck use.

Raymarine i70

Raymarine i70
Raymarine’s i70 Courtesy Raymarine

Raymarine’s i70s multifunction instrument display ($479) complements the manufacturer’s eS and gS MFDs. It also plays nicely with Raymarine’s proprietary SeaTalkNG network or — with the addition of a Raymarine SeaTalk to DeviceNet adapter — an NMEA 2000 backbone. The i70s has a 4.1-inch, optically bonded, all-­weather LCD screen. In addition to displaying ­standard information such as depth, temperature and wind speed, the i70s supports customizable data screens and serves as an AIS repeater.

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