Imaginocean Yacht Design's Two New Projects

What started as a tender design project turned into a two-boat deal. Tasmania-based Imaginocean Yacht Design is working with fellow Aussie company C.Way to build a 26-foot tender and a 154-foot motoryacht.

Imaginocean Yacht Design tender and motoryacht

What started as a tender design project turned into a two-boat deal. Tasmania-based Imaginocean Yacht Design is working with fellow Aussie company C.Way to build a 26-foot tender and a 154-foot motoryacht.

C.Way is a relatively new company, initially formed to finish the 121-foot Tango that began construction at Oceanfast a few years ago. Now C.Way is contracting with a variety of builders for both custom and semicustom yachts. C.Way approached Imaginocean Yacht Design to create a tender that could serve multiple purposes, not just shuttle guests to and from shore. The result is the edgy-looking eight-seater boat in the rendering above. Presently under construction at an unnamed shipyard in Hobart, Australia, the aluminum and composite tender should launch in a few months.

During the design process of the tender, the principals of C.Way and Imaginocean Yacht Design began discussing motoryacht design. They all felt better speed, lower fuel consumption, and more were possible, yet not being achieved in most designs. A few more conversations and computer modeling attempts later, and the 154-footer in the rendering was created. Will Allison, head of Imaginocean Yacht Design, says, “We based the design on a longer, lower platform that still remains under the 500 gross tons limit. The longer waterline length allows for higher displacement speeds, with lower fuel consumption, while reducing the height improves stability. The motion is more comfortable, with less reliance on active stabilization, and the yacht is simply more pleasant to be aboard.”

C.Way is presently negotiating with shipyards to build the yacht. She’ll emphasize indoor-outdoor spaces for a party of 10 in ways that other builders and designers don’t. For example, rather than have balconies off the saloon, the yacht will have full-height windows that slide open. The skylounge will also be open-air. Of course, the megayacht will also have popular features like the transom beach club and a spa/lounge, located toward the foredeck.

Also different: The master will be half a deck below the saloon. Crewmembers will appreciate having larger than usual cabins, too, with access to stowage spaces on the lowest deck. And the chef will be particularly happy to have the galley on deck... no below-decks, tiny cooking area this, as is increasingly becoming common on some European builds.