Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up

Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
The SureFire G3 LED ($92) is a bright idea in a seaworthy package. Its Nitrolon body is molded for a sure grip and resists weather and corrosion, thanks to O-ring seals. The LED provides extended runtime-nearly 9 1/2 hours-and never needs replacement because there is no filament to break or burn out. Disposable batteries mean it doesn't rely on the ship's electrical system to stay charged, which makes sense if you think about it. SureFire, (800) 828-8809; www.surefire.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
The Sea Waterlight ($1,200) from Sea Recovery has a scratch-resistant tempered glass lens in a stainless steel housing for durability. An adjustable illumination angle lets the user adjust the cone of light from 60 to 120 degrees for any application, from watching marine life to creating ambience for a party on board. Sea Recovery, (800) 354-2000; www.searecovery.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
The SV42 from Sea Vision ($647) uses a large, convex crown glass to create a wider beam that reaches depths of 30 feet. The bronze housing is durable and corrosion- proof and can be mounted as a through-hull or on the surface. Available in white or blue, the light has six LED modules, draws only 0.75 amps and is available in 12 or 24 volts. Underwater Lights USA, (866) 772-0130; www.seavision.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
Anyone who's tried to fix something alone in the dark understands the value of a headlamp: Sometimes you need to work with both hands and have the light shining where you want it. The Vizion eLED Headlamp ($35) takes that good sense and makes it more sensible. Big buttons and knobs let the wearer click through three beam settings, including night-vision-saving red. Waterproof to 33 feet, the compact light is powered by three AAA batteries. A heatrecovery system keeps the LEDs cool and the batteries warm, optimizing the performance of both. Underwater Kinetics, (800) 852-7483; www.uwkinetics.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
The MiniLED Thru-Hull SeaLite ($720) from DeepSea Power & Light is built to put big underwater illumination in tenders where space is at a premium. The MiniLED can be operated while the boat is underway without the LEDs overheating, thanks to thermal rollback circuitry. The unit's electronics are integrated into a watertight fitting that can be serviced from inside the boat. Deep Sea Power & Light, (858) 576-1261; www.deepsee.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
The Aqualuma six-LED light ($1,199) is mounted in a one-piece housing of high-impact polycarbonate-the same material that goes into bulletproof glass. The lights draw less than one amp on 12- and 24- volt systems. Available in white, blue or green lights, the six-LED was rigorously tested, including heavy hammer blows and pressure-testing to the equivalent of 1,300 feet deep. Aqualuma, (904) 384-9659; www.aqualuma.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
PowerLEDs are a series of high-output overhead fixtures from Imtra (starting at $199) that provide light comparable to halogen fixtures. But PowerLEDs use a fraction of the energy, while their cooler operation eases the strain on air-conditioning systems. The Avalon 105 (shown) is a recessed fixture with two 3-watt LEDs and a flush trim ring for a low-profile appearance. Imtra, (508) 995-7000; www.imtra.com
Gear: Eight Ways to Light it Up
Equipped with shatterproof lenses, Energizer e2 Lithium lights (starting at $45) are housed in rugged aluminum-alloy bodies to stand up to drops on deck, but have elastomer grips to keep those to a minimum. The LED provides intense white light, but the user can dim the beam to preserve battery life, thanks to the Azoteq IQ switch. Energizer, (800) 383-7323; www.energizer.com